Google Music

With the launch of Google Music, the war for digital content is very much on. Amazon and Google present two formidable competitors to Apple’s iTunes hegemony. Key features of Google Music are:

  • Cloud-based auto syncing music library
  • Sharing of purchased music on Google+
  • Exclusive content
  • Free upload of existing music library (to a maximum of 20,000 songs) to the cloud
Music Beta by Google logo

Image via Google

A feature by feature comparison with iTunes and Amazon Music offers insight into the two critical value drivers behind Google Music – deep integration with Google+ (thus leveraging the social aspects of music consumption) and an almost unlimited capacity to transfer existing music libraries (thus reducing lock-in costs and encouraging users of other platforms to shift).

Read more at Official Google Blog: Google Music is open for business.

Advertisements

The Cloud Wars: Box.net offers free 50gb to iOS users

The cloud wars are heating up. To coincide with the launch of 5gb space on the iCloud, Box.net has announced free 50gb of space for iOS users. Compared to the offerings of the market leader, DropBox (2 gb free, 50gb for $10 a month), this is a steal!

Read more at iPad and iPhone Users Get 50 GB FREE Starting Tonight #Box50GB | The Box Blog.

Windows Azure speediest cloud service?

Microsoft‘s cloud service offering, Windows Azure has beaten Amazon’s EC2 and Google’s App Engine in a year long test of cloud speeds. However, this test only evaluates a specific cloud capability by simulating a 2 page website.

Diagram showing overview of cloud computing in...

Image via Wikipedia

While Compuware’s results may be a good starting point for customers trying to decide between various cloud services, they’re not perfect. For example, Salesforce’s Force.com cloud isn’t tested, even though it may be the most widely used platform-as-a-service cloud.

Read more at Windows Azure beats Amazon EC2, Google App Engine in cloud speed test.

Storing Annotations on the Cloud: Kindle books at libraries

A Picture of a eBook

Image via Wikipedia

Amazon has announced that Kindle books can now be borrowed from local libraries in the US. There are two key points to this announcement –

  1. Availability – these books will be available at over 11,000 local libraries.
  2. Advantage of ebooks over traditional paper books – customers will be able to take notes & make annotations (which Amazon will store, for free, on its amazing Amazon cloud). Thus if you borrow or buy the book in the future, your notes will still be there.

This may have major implications on consumer buying and consumption habits – for example, no more waiting for a book to get returned (assuming that there will be no limit to the number of Kindle copies of a book that are ‘stocked’ at a given library). Also, the books will feel like personal copies of the book due to the annotations.

Instant access and a personalized book reading experience – guess some folks may decide not to buy a copy of that ol’ book that they revisit once every few years!

Here is the Amazon press release – Kindle Books Now Available at over 11,000 Local Libraries.