Challenges for middle ranked business schools

The Economist says that middle level business schools in developed economies are finding the going tough as prospective students question their value proposition (starting salary divided by fees). The fees at these schools are increasing due to increases in wages and infrastructure investments. To offset decreasing domestic enrollment, these school have to undertake high costs of recruiting students from emerging economies – which further inflates their cost structures. To continue to attract emerging economy students in the future, these schools will have to consider changes to their curriculum to reflect different realities in different parts of the world.

The Birmingham Business School

Image via Wikipedia

Asian business schools still have a long way to grow. The Economist currently ranks just eight of them among the world’s top 100. Of these, only one, the China Europe International Business School, can be found on mainland China; it has campuses in Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen. India, too, has only one: the Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad (IIM-A).

In time, though, Asian and other emerging-economy business schools will be able to attack the incumbents on a second front: their curriculums.

Read more at Business education: Trouble in the middle | The Economist.

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The Disruptive Innovations of Disruptive Companies

This infographic by focus.com showcases seven disruptive companies. Theoretically, disruptive innovation either creates a new market or creates a new market segment at the bottom / lower end of an existing market. These firms have caused a paradigm shift in their markets or challenged the status quo through their innovation.

 

Disruptive Companies (Infographic)