Twitter Tips – Dr. Seuss Style

The folks over at HootSuite (my current favorite Social Media Management Dashboard) recently came up with this wonderful Dr. Seuss-Inspired Guide to Twitter. Very nice, humorous way to showcase several Twitter Tips for brands (remember #hkuiom – you are also a brand!).

 

David vs Goliath in the Facebook Era – Again

A small town brewery was sent a cease and desist letter by Starbucks. Their hilarious response posted on their Facebook page went viral. ‘Nuf said!

See original article here.

Technology Trends

Key tech trends include wearable computing, contextual apps, big data and maturation of social networks.

 

Futurologist Robert Scoble has predicted four major tech trends – wearable computing (see my previous posts here), contextual apps, Big Data (see previous posts here), and social network maturation.

future

future (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee)

 

While these trends will surely change commerce practice in the coming years, the nexus of these trends will be immensely disruptive. Think convergence – contextual apps on wearable computers that provide services based on real-time analysis of social and location data, delivered via omnipresent wireless internet access.

 

Wearable computing: Think Google Glasses or Motorola Solutions’ new HC1 headset computer that you attach to your head and operate with voice commands

The “open world”: Android’s relative openness has encouraged “contextual apps” to emerge from the woodwork. “Apple doesn’t let them [developers] talk to the WiFi radio or bluetooth radio,” said Scoble.

Weird databases and the rise of “big data”: “We are seeing weird databases spring up like mushrooms,” said Scoble. These include NoSQL, Firebase, and MongoDB.

The maturation of social networks: The leading social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn are accumulating a massive store of user-generated data. What will they do with it?

 

Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2012/10/24/scoble-kawasaki/#B8hsX6orKpglPyWy.99

New ‘Social’ Experience at Box

Box.net start screen (iPad)

Box.net start screen (iPad) (Photo credit: Rob Enslin)

Box has just announced a series of updates that revolve around providing a more ‘social’ experience to its users.

 

 

 

These updates are clearly aimed at gaining more enterprise customers for Box by enabling more interaction and engagement and making it easier for sharing and collaboration. However, many enterprise customers will value utility over the ‘Facebookisation’ of Box. This is where the new enhanced search functionality, and the ability to edit documents from within the application are potential game-changers. Below is a video detailing these changes.

 

 

On the whole, Box needs to maintain a fine balance – by incorporating a much-needed social fabric (and the ensuing chaos, privacy concerns, information overload), it risks loosing its key differentiation factor with its main competition Dropbox – of being a no-nonsense, secure, enterprise oriented service.

 

 

 

 

The Social Impact of Social Media (Infographic)

Twitter and Facebook are blamed for being the catalysts of recent (good and bad) events –  cue the happenings in Egypt and the recent tidings from India. Whatever be the impact,  social media has become a major means by which the voices of people are heard, and primary means to news (which at times is spread faster) for many. This infographic, at open-site.org, nicely captures the social impacts of social media, or the power of the internet community.

 

Image via Open-Site.Org

See the original infographic here.

Why you should link to my blog and I should link to yours

A forthcoming paper in Management Science investigates the theoretical reasons behind blog links. Linking one’s blog to another blog by way of static or dynamic links is common in the blogosphere.

In a small random sample of blogs, we found that 61% of blogs contained at least one link to another site in the last 10 posts, with approximately 72% of links going to other blogs, 13% to newspaper sites, and the rest to other sites.

However, on face value the practice of linking to another (potentially rival) blog might lead to some complications, and thus seems counter-intuitive.

First, a reader who follows the outgoing link may not return to the original site in the short run. Second, a link implies that the linked blog has interesting content, which can improve the reader’s perception of a competing site.

Using a game theoretic model, the authors of this paper show that bloggers link to another blog, not just in mere expectation of reciprocity (i.e. link to me because I linked to you), which happens to be the most common reasoning given by blog gurus.

Instead, bloggers link due to their desire to signal the quality of their own blog. By linking to another blog, bloggers not just showcase their own ability to find breaking news, but also signal the ability of the linked blog to break news. On the whole, this kind of behavior leads to an increase in the overall experience of readers.

Bloggers link because doing so improves the reader’s inference about the blog’s quality and ultimately increases the readership to their site

An important implication of these findings are that the sum of links of a blog can be a proxy for blog success / quality.

… we find that both the number of incoming and outgoing links may serve as a
metric of blog quality.

So what are you waiting for? Let the links begin! Smile

Blagofaire

Image by xkcd

References:

Mayzlin, D. and Yoganarasimhan, H. “Link to Success: How Blogs Build an Audience by Promoting Rivals”, Management Science.

mnsc.1110.1510; published online before print July 30, 2012, doi:10.1287/mnsc.1110.1510